Stop dangerous algal blooms from choking our waterways to death

Harmful algal blooms are choking the life out of freshwater lakes, ponds, rivers and even reservoirs in all fifty states.

And the impact of harmful algal blooms can be severe: fish die-offs at a favorite fishing spot, pets poisoned after drinking from a contaminated lake, or even children with blisters and rashes from swimming in an affected river.

Dangerous algal blooms occur when cyanobacteria accumulate in the water and produce toxins that can threaten public and environmental health. They occur more and more as polluted run-off leaks into waterways from streets and, increasingly, from industrial animal facilities. Increasing temperatures from climate change is also creating the perfect breeding place for toxic bacteria.

As Trump rolls back water pollution protections, states need to take action themselves to protect our waterways.

Take action. Contact your governor to push for more urgent action to fight the harmful algal blooms plaguing our waterways.

Harmful algal blooms are choking the life out of freshwater lakes, ponds, rivers, and even reservoirs throughout the country. They occur more and more as polluted run-off leaks into waterways from streets and, increasingly, from industrial animal facilities — and it's affecting public health and the environment. States need to tackle this problem and invest in proactively reducing the nutrient run off fueling these harmful algal blooms.

Your message will be sent to:

Your governor

Subject line:

Take stronger action on dangerous algal blooms plaguing our waters and our health

(Consider adding your own thoughts — personalized messages are especially effective)

Your Information

    Not ? Click here.
    Enter mobile number to receive urgent action and breaking news alerts to your cell phone.
    By opting in you agree to the terms of our privacy policy.

    When you take action you'll become a member of NRDC's Activist Network. We will keep you informed with the latest alerts and progress reports.